God’s will.

One of the biggest questions I hear in Christian circles is that of what is God’s will for my life. What is God’s plans and purposes for my life. God what do you want me to do? And these questions should never be taken lightly. The prophet Micah gives us a great insight as to what God’s will for our lives is. He gives us a good framework in which we can truly continue to build upon a life that is pleasing to God.

Mic 6:8  He has told you, O man, what is good; and what does the LORD require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?

God’s will is that we will be people who do justice. We will practice justice. And we will temper our justice with kindness. We are to be people who love kindness. It can often appear when Christians talk about justice…all measure of kindness is thrown out the window. Or there is the other extreme where we believe kindness means no justice. Finally the prophet Micah is told to walk in humility with God.

The prophet is speaking into a society that considered its self God’s people. Yet the society was lead by a government and religious leaders who created a society of corruption, injustice and a lack of compassion for the poor, orphans, widows, refugee and the broken within their community. The rich became richer while hold distain for the poor.

God rallies and rises up a prophet to speak to the Hebrew people, to speak to their rulers – calling them to change – or they would bring destruction upon their nation. And of course we read through the scriptures that they didn’t listen and destruction and captivity was the result.

Skip forward a few hundred years and we see Jesus working within the frame work of justice, kindness and humility. He goes to the broken and down trodden within society. He eats, drinks and shares his life with the sinners and tax collectors. he hugs,  touches and embraces the lepers of society. He shows them compassion and tells them that they are forgiven  and that God is once again in their midst.

My question to you is this – are you willing to live a life that is in accordance with God’s will; one that does justice, loves kindness and walks in humility!

Advertisements

About Craig Benno

I'm an average aussie guy who has lived perhaps a not so average life.
This entry was posted in God's will, Lifestyle and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to God’s will.

  1. tildeb says:

    No. Absolutely not. I am willing to live in a country that is based on secular justice and endorses secular political values and fight strenuously against anyone who thinks some kind of religiously sanctioned dominionism and/or governmental theocracy is preferable. For clarification of why this is also what you want, too, even if you fail to recognize it for what it is – your legal freedom to worship as you choose – check this out, please. You owe it to yourself to understand why you don’t need to call on god but on good reasons to produce good governance.

  2. Craig Benno says:

    Tildeb…I think you have entirely missed the intent and purpose of my post. You are an intelligent man and it makes me wonder if your skim reading what I say and thinking that I am saying some thing I am not?

    • tildeb says:

      You suggest we are to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with God. To do justice is to follow a law that is itself fair, that itself contains respect for the shared rights and freedoms of all. OT law clearly and unequivocally does not do this. No religious law does. It is based not on the shared values of respect for all people but for all people to yield authority to god. It is a corrupt basis to form government. It is rotten to the core even when clothed by such words as ‘kindness’ and ‘humility’ and ‘humble(ness)’. Jesus himself tells us that he endorses the Law, meaning the OT laws that formed the theocracy you claim was corrupt, but what is corrupt is yielding authority to god without any means to determine authority for what?

      So, no. I haven’t missed the point of your post to exercise kindness but point out the great danger of exercising faith in public domain through such institutions as law.

  3. Craig Benno says:

    Tildeb… the context of my post was clearly in regards to Christians seeking God’s will for their lives….

    Clearly your not a Christian and its clear that you have no interest in becoming one and have no intention of accepting the forgiveness and love that is offered by Christ.

    Therefore the post has nothing to do with you or with society in general…rather its to do with how Christians are to live within the frame work of society as a Christian.

    Not did I mention a thing about living within the framework of the OT; which was a framework of law within the Jewish culture…..however within that framework of OT Law – there is a huge amount dedicated to social justice…caring for the orphans, caring for the sick, caring for the widows, caring for the refugee, caring for you wife and children etc..

    It is in this sense that God rebukes the nation of Israel for there lack of following the law…within the NT perspective…Christians have received (or supposed to) the empowering presence of God, and therefore the outworking of that should be to be doers of justice, be lovers of kindness and because we do have the Spirit of God working in our lives; its only natural that we walk humbly before God.

    I don’t and can’t expect you to do that…Because you don’t care about the things of God.

    • tildeb says:

      Well, when you spend half the post outlining that

      The prophet is speaking into a society that considered its self God’s people. Yet the society was lead by a government and religious leaders who created a society of corruption, injustice and a lack of compassion for the poor, orphans, widows, refugee and the broken within their community. The rich became richer while hold distain for the poor.

      God rallies and rises up a prophet to speak to the Hebrew people, to speak to their rulers – calling them to change – or they would bring destruction upon their nation. And of course we read through the scriptures that they didn’t listen and destruction and captivity was the result.

      …what you are doing is suggesting that the blame for the destruction lies with a society organized and supported by rulers that caused the corruption, that the prophet came forth to tell them – meaning the rulers – to change but, because they didn’t, god caused its end.

      So I don’t think you are being honest to then say that Therefore the post has nothing to do with you or with society in general and that this understanding to which I have commented is somehow outside of what you intended and that it is my atheism that has misled me. You are very much suggesting that those in positions of public authority should do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with God rather than uphold and enforce secular law by which their offices have been empowered. This is a religious form of sedition, one used by the vatican forever to influence and subvert secular authority and affect secular law and it is not a small problem to have to repeatedly battle and overcome. We see it playing out through the secular world as religion is used to sway public officials to abuse their public power from secular offices to have the state bully those who disagree with a particular faith-based notion. It is wrong. It is immoral. It is abuse. It is bullying. And it comes clothed in religious garb and religious nicities and religious piousness and religious justification and it it has to be fought tooth and nail. Just look to your own public school system that transfers public money to fund religious advocates in every public school. It’s unfair, unkind, and not in the least bit humble, even if all those who push religious favoritism in the public schools on the public dime believe themselves to be walking humbly with god for what they mistakenly believe the nicest and kindest of reasons.

      • Craig Benno says:

        If your were Biblically literate; you would realise that the prophet Micah was speaking to his fellow Israelites who lived within a framework of a theocracy; which Christianity came out of and in many ways destroyed the concept of a political theocracy’s.

        A Christian politician is called to exercise justice towards all, within a framework of kindness towards all and because he/she is a Christian – which means they are worshipping God and no other.

        And so your rant has made the point in which I have spoken off…and is a fair representation of what the Prophet Micah spoke against…therefore you are speaking of those who call themselves Christian – who don’t do justice and don’t love kindness and therefore while they may call it otherwise…they are not walking humbly before the Lord.

        I love it when we can agree! 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s